Instrument Rating

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Instrument Rating

Posted by Michael Walpole on Jul 19, 2017 5:26 pm

I am planning to start IFR training around the first of the year.  What would be good materials to get for study purposes between now and then.
Mike W
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Re: Instrument Rating

Posted by Ronald Levy on Jul 20, 2017 8:05 am

There are a lot of good IR knowledge training materials out there, but the choice depends largely on your personal learning style.  Some folks like the video lecture style you find in the King courses, others prefer a more interactive multimedia type like Sporty's, and stll others want an interactive computer-based training system like the one Jeppesen offers, and some would rather read a book such as Bob Gardner's Complete Advanced Pilot (which includes Commercial as well as Instrument) or Bill Kershner's Instrument Flight Manual.  They're all quality products, but you have to find the one which best fits the way you learn.

Re: Instrument Rating

Posted by Eduardo Rodriguez on Sep 5, 2017 1:01 pm

Best balance between price and completeness: Gleim. Get the Gleim Pilot Handbook, the Gleim Instrument Maneuvers, and the Gleim online ground school. That's it. with a good CFII, you'll pass. That's how I did it and I found Gleim fit the bill perfectly. 

Re: Instrument Rating

Posted by Bryan Boyle on Sep 13, 2017 9:40 am

Tackling the Instrument Rating is probably the most intense and satisfying training that you will encounter and master.  There's a reason why, if you're an aircraft owner, nothing affects your insurance rate more than achieving the Instrument Airplane on the ticket.  Not even the Commercial, not the CFI, not the ATP...the IA is where you will learn to really focus and understand the finer points of airspace, navigation, weather, performance, and YOURSELF. 

Some of my CFIs over the years have likened it to going to combined advanced infantry and Ranger training after basic...you know how to fly...now you're going to learn how to control the aircraft.

You can never read too many books about it.  There have been some great suggestions above...I'd add in Kershner's Advanced Pilot manual, Peter Dogan's Instrument Flight Training Manual, as well as, not to be discounted, the Jeppesen Instrument/Commercial Manual and the FAA's own Instrument Flying Handbook.  Ditto on the Gleim manuals.  Excellent choices all.

BTW, I have no financial interest in any of the above, blah bla blah.

It will be frustrating (at least initially); we've been telling you to look outside for x number of hours...now we're not going to let you look outside.  You will learn really fine trim control, and how pitch plus power really equals airspeed, and determine the numbers for everything from climb, level, decent, turns, approaches, etc.  And not just what the GPS tells you, but how to set the plane up based on what the gauges say and return you predictable performance.  You know how to fly...the IA rating will now give you the real tools to visualize yourself in 3 dimensions.

After you're done...your VFR flying will be vastly improved...3500' cruise to the local c-note hamburger joint?  Yeah, you'll be tapping the altimeter since it will look stuck on 3500'.  :)

If I sound like I'm waxing poetic about it...you won't be disappointed...especially after you shoot your first solo approach to a field in actual...and say to yourself "wow, it really works!".  Darn tootin'

Hope this helps, and we soon welcome you to the ranks of the wet-wing aviators!

Bryan
CFI-IA
Princeton Airport (39N)
Princeton NJ

Re: Instrument Rating

Posted by Ronald Levy on Sep 15, 2017 8:24 am

Bryan Boyle:
You can never read too many books about it.  There have been some great suggestions above...I'd add in Kershner's Advanced Pilot manual, Peter Dogan's Instrument Flight Training Manual, as well as, not to be discounted, the Jeppesen Instrument/Commercial Manual and the FAA's own Instrument Flying Handbook.  Ditto on the Gleim manuals.  Excellent choices all.

The Dogan book is an outstanding training manual for the flight training portion of your IR training, but not particularly useful for preparing for the written test.  OTOH, knowledge preparation materials such as the Jeppesen Instrument/Commercial Manual aren't a lot of help for the flight portion.

Re: Instrument Rating

Posted by Bryan Boyle on Sep 15, 2017 9:46 am

Ronald Levy:

***DELETIA***

The Dogan book is an outstanding training manual for the flight training portion of your IR training, but not particularly useful for preparing for the written test.  OTOH, knowledge preparation materials such as the Jeppesen Instrument/Commercial Manual aren't a lot of help for the flight portion.

 

No doubt; it would be great if there was a manual that combined both, but, more than the Private or even the Commercial maneuvers (which are, in the end, more concerned with aircraft control than the process by which you accomplish the flight), which can be described and dissected with diagrams, IR flight, in my estimation (or opinion, choose one or both) is something that requires both the intellectual understanding of what is happening as well as the muscle memory to actually integrate the stimuli (aircraft performance/scan/navigation/routing/comms/etc) successfully, time after time.

I agree with your opinion, btw...as you would agree, successful pilots need both...and the FAA written is, like all government tests (I also proctor tests for Amateur Radio and the GROL) not necessarily the most accurate assessment of pilot accomplishment...or reflection of the reality of flight.  It's a requirement, not a reliable gauge, that's all.  The skill comes later (which is why I'm one of those luddites who feels that the FCC was wrong to drop the code requirement...an argument for another day...:)) at the practical. 

A well-rounded experience would use, say, Jepp for the theoretical, and Dogan for the air work (just as an example).  Complimentary and reinforce and integrate the 'what does this symbol on the map mean' with the 'oh, that's what the difference is between a green and blue airport on the chart' when flying towards it...

Thanks for commenting...safe flying, Ron.

Bryan
CFI-IA
Princeton (39N) Airport NJ

Re: Instrument Rating

Posted by Ronald Levy on Sep 16, 2017 11:14 am

Bryan Boyle:

Ronald Levy:

***DELETIA***

The Dogan book is an outstanding training manual for the flight training portion of your IR training, but not particularly useful for preparing for the written test.  OTOH, knowledge preparation materials such as the Jeppesen Instrument/Commercial Manual aren't a lot of help for the flight portion.

 

A well-rounded experience would use, say, Jepp for the theoretical, and Dogan for the air work (just as an example).  Complimentary and reinforce and integrate the 'what does this symbol on the map mean' with the 'oh, that's what the difference is between a green and blue airport on the chart' when flying towards it...
Exactly.  But since Michael isn't starting flight training for several more months, I think studying the knowledge material would be the best use of his time and effort between now and then.