Safety on the taxiway

5 Replies

Safety on the taxiway

Posted by John Gunn on Oct 7, 2018 9:34 am

Recently, while taxiing down an open taxiway, (class D airport) i was instructed to yield to another plane approaching the taxiway from the ramp.  I did so, but in thinking about this, why would ATC do this?  I'm already rolling, so is she, someone has to stop & yield, so why would ATC have the aircraft on the right of the other & currently operating in controlled airspace yield?  How does allowing the other plane to enter an occupied taxiway w/o stopping; enhance safety?  In talking w/ other pilots w/ far more experience than I, this is apparently a rare event.  I would personally decline "unable", if instructed to enter a taxiway w/ an a/c approaching on my right @ < than 1000+ feet.
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Re: Safety on the taxiway

Posted by Ronald Levy on Oct 7, 2018 10:43 pm

I'm not sure what you mean when you said you were operating in controlled airspace if you were on a taxiway -- did you mean operating in the movement area?

ATC may have had a good reason to allow the aircraft coming out to get in front of you, but without having the Ground controller's broader perspective, there's no way for you (or any of us)  to know why s/he did that.  There are any number of reasons to do that based on the ultimate destinations on the field of the two different aircraft as well as the overall flow of traffic and takeoff sequencing.  But the fact that an aircraft is already in the movement area doesn't mean it automatically has to be given priority over an aircraft coming out of a non-movement area.

In any event, if you had a concern about how you were handled, the best avenue to pursue would have been to call the tower on the phone after you shut down and politely ask why it happened that way.

Re: Safety on the taxiway

Posted by Lauren McGavran on Oct 8, 2018 11:22 am

It happens to me often enough not to be a surprise. If I am flying a light sport, especially if I am staying in the pattern, the controller will often give priority to the scheduled flights, IFR flights, and faster planes or planes that are going somewhere. I am not IFR rated, but it is my understanding that IFR flights have time constraints. I am definitely a low priority flight, though that is not to say that I am not given all the help and services that I need.

Re: Safety on the taxiway

Posted by John Gunn on Oct 9, 2018 7:48 am

Hello Lauren & thnx for your response.  I too am flying a LSA (Aerotrek A-240), so maybe thats it.  Your point about IFR schedules was a good one, in this instance it was a cessna 15x, so unlikely in this instance.
I'd like to think we're all equal in "priority", unless an air ambulance or govt a/c is being dispatched out on a mission.
Like your avatar, i'll have to load one up.  

Cheers / jg

Re: Safety on the taxiway

Posted by John Gunn on Oct 13, 2018 9:38 am

Just reviewed this & realized it appears i didnt respond to Ron, we have actually had an extended discussion via the private messaging & he being a CFI, has given me some homework  : }

We're lucky he chooses to participate.

Bummer;   https://www.npr.org/2018/10/12/656807686/following-crash-all-f-35s-temporarily-grounded-for-inspections


 

Re: Safety on the taxiway

Posted by Ronald Levy on Oct 14, 2018 10:28 am

John Gunn:
Hello Lauren & thnx for your response.  I too am flying a LSA (Aerotrek A-240), so maybe thats it.  Your point about IFR schedules was a good one, in this instance it was a cessna 15x, so unlikely in this instance.

I"be trained several people for their instrument rating in a Cessna 150/152, including one recently where due to weather we made half the training flights under IFR, so it may be more likely than you think.

I'd like to think we're all equal in "priority", unless an air ambulance or govt a/c is being dispatched out on a mission.

The rule is generally "first come, first served", but there are many factors involved, and unless you call the Tower after flight and ask, you won't know what drove their decision.